Violet

Violet

A flowering plant from the genus Viola that exhibits leafy stems, or is stemless in nature, and has a generally stout appearance. Often attributed with having the bluish, purply color of which it draws its namesake, it can also come in a variety of colors from yellow to white. The scent produced by the flowers is often described as being pleasant and inviting, arriving in wafts. This is as a result of the compound Ionone, which when detected by the nose, causes a reaction that momentarily disengages the nose’s ability to smell the aromas of the plant. The scent is described as being almost woody, with hints of sweetness throughout. The nature of the scent — coming and going — is often labelled as being “flirty”, which has become a characteristic trait of the violet fragrance.

Violet derived products and compounds are often used in the perfume industry in various perfumes and fragrances, with the synthetic variant being more common than the natural oil. Almost every fragrance possesses at least some degree of ionones or methyl ionones — compounds originally derived from violets. The synthetic products are almost identical in aroma to the unadulterated flower.

Violet is also commonly used as a primary dying component in the fabrics industry.